About Mieke Jans

Mieke Jans obtained a PhD in the domain of Accounting Information Systems at Hasselt University. Her PhD topic on process mining for forensic purposes led her to a carreer start in consulting at Deloitte Belgium. As part of the data analytics team, she worked on very diverse topics, ranging from predictive asset management to supporting IT audits. The common denominator of all projects was business analytics. In September 2014, Mieke returned to the academic world, pursuing the research that interests her most: how to turn process analytics techniques into workable support for financial auditors?

From relational database to valuable event logs for process mining – A procedure

The huge potential of process mining applications is -luckily- already discovered in a variety of business settings. In industry, more and more companies are learning about its potential value. In meanwhile, academic researchers continue their quest to the best algorithm, the most meaningful metrics, the most understandable visualisations, etcetera. Whatever ‘best’, ‘meaningful’, and ‘understandable’ may be… These are food for thought and discussion on their own. But I’d like to address a different mini-research-topic-on-its-own: the event log.

An implicit assumption in process mining (both research and applications), is the existence of an event log.

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Students Business Informatics organized their first Service Jam

Three weeks ago, the students from ‘business and information systems engineering (BI)’ at Hasselt University organized a service jam #servicejamhasselt.

“A service jam resembles a musical jam session: you take your instruments and start to experiment. The idea is to make fun and start creating, not only brainstorming.” says Geert Tewissen, service designer at Boondoggle.

Many times the creation of new products starts from the possibilities these products can offer: the solution. Yet ideally, a new product should stem from a problem. This is certainly the case for IT-driven products and services. The stream of design thinking provides counterweight to this solution-based approach. A solid service design pulls you back to the origin of your business: which problem of which person(s) are we going to solve?

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